QB Schulte led some of JCJC's best teams

Written By: Shawn Wansley
Email Address: shawn.wansley@jcjc.edu
Date Submitted: 2011-09-20 09:07:16

 By Shawn Wansley

JCJC Sports Information Director

ELLISVILLE – If one checks the Jones County Junior College football records from 1954-55, two things will come to mind.

First, those Bobcat teams were good and secondly, they could pile up the points.

One of the reasons those teams had so much success was because of the play of quarterback Kenneth Schulte.

“What a great guy,” said John Ashley, who was a teammate of Schulte’s at JCJC. “He was one of the best passers I’ve ever seen. Of course, we did not throw the ball as much back then. We might have thrown it only 10 or 12 times a game.

“But I played end and I really liked it when Ken threw the ball.”

Schulte is one of five inductees for the 2011 Class of the Bobcat Sports Hall of Fame. He joins Parker Dykes, Elmer Higginbotham, Dale Crowder and Wilmer Dennis to comprise this year’s class. They will be inducted in a ceremony at 5 p.m. on Saturday during a banquet in A.B. Howard Gymnasium.

The inductees will then be honored as honorary captains for the 7:30 p.m. football game against Co-Lin Community College that evening and will be recognized again at halftime.

Schulte came to JCJC from Holy Cross High School in New Orleans, La., in 1953 when Paul Davis was the head coach.

“I was at Jones in 1953 when Ken was a freshman,” said Ashley, who was from Bay Springs High School. “But Coach Davis wanted Ken to redshirt that year. So, I played in 1953-54 and he played in 1954-55.”

Schulte and JCJC enjoyed enormous success in his two years on the field.

He was an All-American in both years, leading the Bobcats to an 8-1 record in 1954 and a 9-1 record and a state championship in 1955.

The Bobcats played for the national championship in the 1955 Junior Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif., where they lost to Compton College (Calif.), 22-13.

That game is one of the most famous contests in the history of the state because it marked the first time a team from Mississippi played against a school with black athletes.

During the nine-game 1955 season, JCJC scored 326 points and allowed just 110.  In his freshman year, Schulte’s Bobcats outscored the opposition 277-77.

Schulte participated in the 1955 Mississippi Junior College All-Star Game and was named the state’s Most Outstanding Back.

In 1954, the Bobcats lost only one game – 20-14 to Hinds, which cost them a state title and an earlier trip to the Junior Rose Bowl.

“That’s the most frustrating game I remember in my two years at Jones,” said Ashley, who now resides in Brandon. “Hinds got to go to Pasadena that year and we did not. But I loved my two years there.”

Schulte then headed to the University of Georgia, where he played for legendary head coach Wally Butts. Schulte broke his wrist in the spring of his senior season and assisted the UGA freshmen quarterbacks, one of whom was future NFL great Fran Tarkenton.

He graduated from Georgia with a degree in geology and would obtain his master’s degree from Tulane University. Upon recommendation from his professor at Tulane, Schulte was hired and employed by Schlumberger Oil Services for 30 years. He was a member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers.

“I kind of lost touch with Ken for a long time, but I know he went on to enjoy great success,” Ashley said.

Schulte was a true outdoorsman and conservationist, working with Ducks Unlimited and other outdoor groups until his death in 1995.

 He and his wife, Mary, have three children and eight grandchildren.

Ashley, who nominated Schulte for the Bobcat Sports Hall of Fame, will be on campus for Saturday’s ceremony.

“I am looking forward to it,” he said. “Jones was and still is a very special place.”

 

 

 

Bobcat Sports Hall of Fame

Class of 2007 – Sim Cooley, Joe Flowers, A.B. Howard

Class of 2008 – Randall Boone, John Perkins, Gene Tullos

Class of 2009 – Gwen Magee, L.D. Ready, Jerry “Sally” Smith, Aubrey Wade, Patricia Waldrup

Class of 2010 – Mike McClellan, Carlos McDaniel, Dr. Joe-Michael Robertson

 

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